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Captain America Civil War: Whose Side Are You On?

Nuanced Sides of Captain America: Civil War

Ever since I first heard about Captain America: Civil War, I’ve been solidly on Team Cap’s anti-registration side. For those who aren’t nerds, here’s the basic plot: after the events of previous movies where all these superpowered humans wreak havoc on the world, governments of the world (mostly the U.S.) want to register those with superpowers so they can provide some oversight to their activities. Iron Man is pro-registration, which makes sense given that the last Avengers movie villain was literally his creation and he feels guilty about it. Captain America leads the anti-registration side, which culminates the direction of his character throughout The Winter Soldier and Age of Ultron but in this case will be sparked by defending his friend Bucky. The majority of the characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (except Thor and Hulk who get a movie later) line up on one side or the other.

I had a lightbulb moment watching this video from The Mary Sue, though, that made it harder for me to think Cap is clearly in the right:

Technology - Bible and Headphones

Thoughts on a Lenten Fast

Twitter logoFor the first time in a few years, I decided to give up something for Lent this year (I have done Ash Wednesday and Good Friday food fasts the past couple years). I had been feeling the urge for some time to take a social media break anyway, so this gave me a good excuse.

Miscellaneous

First, some of the miscellaneous observations so far:

My BlackBerry battery lasts about twice as long. How much of that was directly from the Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram apps operating in the background vs how much was because the screen isn’t on as often for me to check it, I can’t say for sure, but I would guess the former because of the next point. If we’re talking about practicalities of living a bit more simply, this is a more significant one than I thought – I don’t have to worry about my phone being dead by the end of a work day plus Home Church, for example.

Technology - Bible and Headphones

Pacifist Video Games

Fallout 4 cover artI just now came across a fascinating story from back in December about Kyle Hinckley who managed to beat the game Fallout 4 without killing a single person. Well, not really. He managed to avoid directly killing anybody, but he did do things like brainwashing non-playable characters into doing it for him.

Kyle said this to Kotaku:

I’d love to ask [the developers] why pacifism is so difficult in this Fallout … I’m a little disappointed in the lack of diplomatic solutions in this game, it’s a lonely departure from the rest of the Fallout series. My version of pacifism isn’t really diplomatic, it’s more exploitative of the game mechanics to achieve a zero-kill record. In other [Fallout] games, you had a lot of alternatives for bypassing the combat, whether it was with sneaking, speech checks, or a back door opened with lock-picking and hacking. In fact, in previous games (at least 3 and NV), your companion kills didn’t count towards your record either.

I don’t know much about the Fallout games at all, but this is a worrying trend in the video game industry in general. I’m not primarily talking about the long-running question of whether we become more violent by playing violent video games.

Bible

Unprotected Texts by Jennifer Wright Knust

Unprotected TextsUnprotected Texts by Jennifer Wright Knust seeks to make a biblical analysis of various topics related to sex. In general, it’s academically rigorous but very accessible and I would recommend it, although some sections definitely dragged on more for me than others. The topics themselves were definitely interesting. Some I had learned more about in my own studies, particularly the current cultural controversies. Others tackled questions I hadn’t even thought to ask. The chapters:

  1. The Bible and the Joy of Sex, texts like Song of Songs that view sex as a good thing
  2. Biblical Marriage, the complicated and varying definitions of marriage in the Bible
  3. The Evil Impulse, particularly Jesus and Paul’s call to celibacy
  4. Sexual Politics, the inconsistent rules against certain types of sex
  5. Strange Flesh, the one consistent sex rule: no sex with angels
  6. Bodily Parts, circumcision and genital emissions

Some people are probably squirming just reading that list since a small portion of the Western church (and culture in general) are actually willing to talk about sex. That makes this book extra important if only for its willingness to be honest and comprehensive about what the Bible actually says: a fair bit, but probably not what you think or as clearly as you think.

Giza Pyramids

Lazy Slaves?

Giza Pyramids

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Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:All_Gizah_Pyramids.jpg

I couldn’t help but see some present day parallels with the Old Testament text in my daily lectionary reading for today:

10The slave bosses and the men in charge of the slaves went out and told them, “The king says he will not give you any more straw.11Go and find your own straw wherever you can, but you must still make as many bricks as before.”

12The slaves went all over Egypt, looking for straw.13But the slave bosses were hard on them and kept saying, “Each day you have to make as many bricks as you did when you were given straw.”14The bosses beat the men in charge of the slaves and said, “Why didn’t you force the slaves to make as many bricks yesterday and today as they did before?”

15Finally, the men in charge of the slaves went to the king and said, “Why are you treating us like this?16No one brings us any straw, but we are still ordered to make the same number of bricks. We are beaten with whips, and your own people are to blame.”

17The king replied, “You are lazy—nothing but lazy!

Super Bowl 50 logo

SB50: Beyoncé, Bruno, and Cam

Super Bowl 50 logoI’m a casual (American) football fan. I probably watch 2 regular season games a year, then a couple of playoffs before the Super Bowl, which is more of an excuse to hang out with friends and eat unhealthy food than to watch the game. There were a couple of interesting things happen this year, though.

The Halftime Show: Beyoncé, Bruno Mars… and Coldplay

Technically this was supposed to be Coldplay’s halftime show. I don’t have any problem with Coldplay. They did a fine job. But they probably should have marketed it as Beyoncé featuring Coldplay and Bruno Mars, because Beyoncé was who everyone was waiting to see. Coldplay opened with some of their pleasant singable rock anthems. Then Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson performed Uptown Funk.

Then Beyoncé showed up, singing her new political song Formation. If you haven’t seen that yet, here’s the music video:

Complete Idiot's Guide to Evangelical Christianity

Allegiance to a Label

Complete Idiot's Guide to Evangelical ChristianityLinguistics 101: language changes. Language assigns words or phrases as a way to communicate different ideas. These ideas are not fixed for eternity. English is very different today than it was 1000 years ago. Before that, there were several source languages that became English. Even today, we are adding new words and phrases every year. Language is inherently arbitrary, with the exception of onomatopoeia. That’s just how language works.

This is significant for me when talking about questions like why I don’t identify as an “evangelical” anymore. Yes, I used to. And yes, by most historical definitions, I would probably still qualify. In the 18th and 19th centuries, even the first half of the 20th, “evangelical” was the majority of Christians. It meant something specific about how you approached the Bible: as authority but something that must be studied and wrestled with. It was the middle ground between liberals who assumed that the Bible was fundamentally untrustworthy and fundamentalists who refused to ask any questions, preferring to retrench in what their tradition had told them.

Tissot - the Golden Calf

Syrian Refugees and the Israelite Exodus

Tissot - the Golden Calf

Yeah, the Israelites did some stupid things like worship a golden calf, but how about some sympathy for their crappy situation?

An interesting story about some Syrian refugees in Toronto has been making the rounds, discussing how many are beginning to feel hopeless stuck in their hotels waiting to be processed. The article specifically refers to the hotel used as a case as a “budget hotel.” This probably means small rooms crammed with large families, bland and repetitive food, being unable to talk to anybody without knowing English, and being unable to even take your kids outside because it’s not like you could pack winter boots with you from Syria (it’s been a mild winter, but they would still need some winter clothing).

Some people are responding by basically telling them to shut up and stop whining. They’ve made it this far, escaping war and probably years in refugee camps with worse conditions. I can sympathize with that a little bit. In the big picture, another maximum 2 months crowded in a budget hotel is not a huge deal after years it took them to get there. But that also doesn’t really do justice to what they’re going through. Take a moment to imagine you’ve escaped war, took a long journey, spent 3 years in a refugee camp, got the exciting news that you have been approved to come to Canada where you can finally create a life for your children… then you get here and you’re stuck in a 200 square foot room with those four young children 24 hours a day, eating the same bulk processed food every day, your kids can’t play, you can’t talk to anyone except other refugees, and you have no idea when you’ll be allowed to leave.

Poussin, Nicolas - The Victory of Joshua over the Amalekites

Barbs in Your Eyes

Poussin, Nicolas - The Victory of Joshua over the Amalekites

Poussin, Nicolas – The Victory of Joshua over the Amalekites

There are many “texts of terror” in the Bible, mostly in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) but you can find some challenges in the New Testament, too. The biggest challenge often comes when noticing that God apparently orchestrates genocide against the Canaanite people at the hands of the Israelites. One of these texts appear in Numbers 33:55-56, including the rationale for the extinction (NIV)

55 “‘But if you do not drive out the inhabitants of the land, those you allow to remain will become barbs in your eyes and thorns in your sides. They will give you trouble in the land where you will live. 56 And then I will do to you what I plan to do to them.’”

Christians in the modern Western world tend to read this prescriptively: God is ordering genocide because God is afraid that these other people will corrupt Israel. I’ve discussed elsewhere how we can talk about whether or not God actually did command this and why if so, but I want to step past that for a different aspect of the text this time.