Category: Anabaptism

WikiGodPod: Our Stories Shaping God

Creative Process of A Living Alternative

WikiGodPod: Our Stories Shaping God

Recently I was talking about stuff on WikiGodPod, a podcast out of the Greater Toronto Area (I live close to the GTA in Kitchener) centred around our stories and how that shapes how we understand God. I’m not somebody who speaks well without preparation, so the potential questions were sent in advance and I spent a few hours the night before and morning of planning. I figure since I already spent those hours writing notes, I may as well clean them up a bit and publish them here.

What was the process in the book A Living Alternative?

Faith Turning Points

WikiGodPod: Our Stories Shaping GodRecently I was talking about stuff on WikiGodPod, a podcast out of the Greater Toronto Area (I live close to the GTA in Kitchener) centred around our stories and how that shapes how we understand God. I’m not somebody who speaks well without preparation, so the potential questions were sent in advance and I spent a few hours the night before and morning of planning. I figure since I already spent those hours writing notes, I may as well clean them up a bit and publish them here.

Mark’s next question for me was:

What were major turning points in terms of faith and God?

About MennoNerds

Recently I was talking about stuff on WikiGodPod, a podcast out of the Greater Toronto Area (I live close to the GTA in Kitchener) centred around our stories and how that shapes how we understand God. I’m not somebody who speaks well without preparation, so the potential questions were sent in advance and I spent a few hours the night before and morning of planning. I figure since I already spent those hours writing notes, I may as well clean them up a bit and publish them here.

The next question(s), then, adapted to be more chronological:

What is the MennoNerds network?

Talking About Stuff on WikiGodPod

WikiGodPod: Our Stories Shaping GodA week and a half ago, I was interviewed by Mark Groleau for WikiGodPod. It was published this past Monday so you can check it out from the WikiGodPod website or through iTunes or other RSS readers. Aside from my own, I’m happy to recommend this podcast. It brings in a different voice from somewhere in Southern Ontario each week to talk about a range of different things.

In my chat with Mark, we covered my work with the Canadian Bible Society, this blog, pacifism, MennoNerds with our book A Living Alternative, judgementalism around LGBTQ persons in the Church, and embracing our differences instead of condemning each other over them.

A Living Alternative

A Living Alternative Giveaway

A Living AlternativeIt’s that time where I am excited to offer up a copy of A Living Alternative! 

Here’s how to enter:

  1. Follow Anabaptist Redux on Facebook and share the link to this post from there. That post will be pinned to the top of the page. Make sure it is done as a share so it links back to Anabaptist Redux.
  2. Follow MennoNerds on Facebook and share the link from there to the book listing on our website. That post is pinned to the top of the page. Note: if you search for MennoNerds, make sure you go to the page, not the group.
  3. Follow @Ryan_LR on Twitter and tweet:

    I just entered to win a copy of #ALivingAlternative by the @MennoNerds from @Ryan_LR at anabpatistredux.com/a-living-alternative-giveaway

  4. Follow +RyanRobinson on Google Plus and share the link to this blog post from the page there.
  5. Comment on this blog post with why you’re excited to read the book.
  6. Follow @mennonerds on Instagram and reshare the post about Ryan’s giveaway, including the link.
  7. Join the MennoNerds Goodreads group and make a comment on the forum “Ryan’s book giveaway”

We Wrote a Book!

A Living Alternative - Sarah Bessey endorsement

Maybe the title for this post should be a bit more professional, but I’m excited so decided to let that out. About a year and a half ago, we MennoNerds got the opportunity to write an anthology. This is our result: A Living Alternative: Anabaptist Christianity in a Post-Christendom World. The topic, as summarized in the subtitle, is a broad one. So are the styles: mine is much more of an essay, others more personal testimonies, etc. We have a lot of great writers in the MennoNerds network so there’s a lot here that I’m excited to read.

Embracing Ubuntu: The Meeting House

This post is the fifth in a short semi-autobiographical series I’m doing called Embracing Ubuntu. Ubuntu, for those who aren’t familiar, is an African concept that is hard to translate but means something like “diversity in unity.” It is neither uniformity – making everyone the same or not talking about differences – nor is a free-for-all battle where anything goes. It is a recognition that is simple in theory but hard in practice: we are all different and that doesn’t make me better than you. I’ve expressed this idea many times, often using the Anabaptist phrasing the “Third Way,” but in this series I want to give examples of where I have encountered it working.

My Denominational Story

Recently on the MennoNerds Facebook group, Robert was brave enough to ask for denominational history represented amongst our 199 members (as of writing this). I gave the short version there: United Church of Canada (evangelical), Canadian/Convention Baptist, non-denominational conservative evangelical, non-denominational post-conservative/”emerging”, non-denominational charismatic evangelical, United Church of Canada (liberal), Free Methodist, and (neo-)Anabaptist/Brethren in Christ. Those are the groups who I have been actively engaged in their ministry work. But I’m sure you all want to hear the long version along with some of the main things I learned in each “phase.”

2 Approaches to Protestantism

Alister McGrath’s brilliant work Christianity’s Dangerous Idea (full review coming) has this to say in its final section:

For the historian, such cycles of review and renewal seem to be an integral part of Protestant identity….

The pressure of these changes has created a furious debate within sections of Protestantism, leading to a confrontation between two very different visions – one static, the other dynamic – of Protestant identity. On the one hand are Protestant traditionalists who hold that the essence of Protestantism can only be preserved by “freezing” defining moments in the past… For such traditionalists, fidelity to the past is the touchstone of authenticity and integrity.